Short Stories 366:220 — “The Dealey Paradox,” by Brendan DuBois

I really enjoyed this story from Crime Travel, an anthology that marries crime stories with time travel, in that it tackled a conceit you often hear bandied about whenever time travel comes up: if time travel ever became possible, certainly the horrible things that happened wouldn't have happened: someone would have come back to fix … Continue reading Short Stories 366:220 — “The Dealey Paradox,” by Brendan DuBois

Short Stories 366:213 — “Ignition,” by John M. Floyd

With this story, Crime Travel returns from its darker duet of stories to something a bit more hopeful, and as a reader, I was glad to go there. That's not to say "Ignition" doesn't have a few harrowing moments or some dark turns, but more that ultimately, we're on Eddie's side from the get-go, and … Continue reading Short Stories 366:213 — “Ignition,” by John M. Floyd

Short Stories 366:206 — “Love, Or Something Like It,” by Michael Bracken

Oof. Crime Travel, an anthology of short crime fiction linked by the inclusion of time-travel, is another rough one after last week's "Hard Return," and I think the darkest story of the collection as a whole. "Love, Or Something Like It" centres on Kevin Thompson, a physics PhD candidate who, in 1975, is delivering a … Continue reading Short Stories 366:206 — “Love, Or Something Like It,” by Michael Bracken

Short Stories 366:199 — “Hard Return,” by Art Taylor

One of the reasons I sometimes shy away from the darker genres—horror, especially, but also some thrillers and mysteries—is my low threshold for hopelessness and the grim. Thus far, the stories in Crime Travel had all ended on a more-or-less hopeful note, which gave "Hard Return" by Art Taylor all the harder an edge when … Continue reading Short Stories 366:199 — “Hard Return,” by Art Taylor

Short Stories 366:192 — “O Crime, In Thy Flight,” by Eleanor Cawood Jones

So, to say this particular story from Crime Travel was my cup of tea would be understating, but let me paint you the set-up: after giving birth, Charlotte finds she's developed an odd ability: when she touches someone's clothes and thinks about something they lost when they were wearing those clothes, she knows where the … Continue reading Short Stories 366:192 — “O Crime, In Thy Flight,” by Eleanor Cawood Jones

Short Stories 366:185 — “The Fourteenth Floor,” by Adam Meyer

Ah, Crime Travel. This anthology of crime stories with the added theme of time-travel continues to deliver fun and clever little knots of mystery and science fiction, and "The Fourteenth Floor" is no exception. Even better? This one features a character in his sixties, which I always appreciate, in the form of Frank Russo, a … Continue reading Short Stories 366:185 — “The Fourteenth Floor,” by Adam Meyer